Hiking the Taylor River Trail

As we head into spring (finally), Jake, Devyn, and I are all ready to get hiking whenever possible. Finding hikes that are open and accessible this early is challenging, but we decided to brave the chance of a snowy trail to hike to Otter Falls along the Taylor River Trail. We didn’t quite make it to the falls- the trail was indeed covered in a lot of snow, and the alleged sign for the detour to Otter Falls was no where to be found. We did, however, have a wonderful time.

The road to get to the trailhead was pretty traumatizing for this poor little Corgi.

The road to get to the trailhead was pretty traumatizing for this poor little Corgi.

To get to the trailhead, one has to endure 12 straight miles of only driving 5 miles an hour. Why? Potholes. I promise, you have never experienced potholes until you drive along this road. And I live in Seattle, which is renowned for its epic potholes. It took us a good hour and a half just to get to the trail. Devyn had no idea what was going on and spent this hour and a half very confused…and shaken.

After getting out of the car, Devyn was just fine, and very excited about the snow!

After getting out of the car Devyn was just fine and very excited about the snow!

After hiking for 5 miles we realized that we could go no further. The snow became impossible to walk on without constantly post holing, so we turned around (as had, made evident from the footprints, everyone else). We found a spot to stop for lunch and enjoyed a nice, freeze-dried meal of mashed potatoes and Pad See You with Chicken.

Devyn feasted on her own food served in our not-quite-empty bowls.

Devyn feasted on her own food served in our not-quite-empty bowls.

...though, being Devyn, all she really cared about was this big biscuit she got...and then proceeded to carry around looking for JUST the right spot to settle and eat.

…though, being Devyn, all she really cared about was this big biscuit she got…and then proceeded to carry around looking for JUST the right spot to settle and eat.

And then, of course, she found a stick to munch on as well.

And then, of course, she found a stick to munch on as well.

After lunch, Devyn was all ready to go another 5 miles.

She's such a trooper.

She’s such a trooper.

We hiked 10 miles round trip on the Taylor River Trail which is relatively flat (gain of 650 feet). We didn’t see a single person for the 4 hours that we were hiking, which considering it was a weekday morning in March is not too surprising. The quiet solitude was very refreshing.

This is the first time Devyn has gone on such a long hike (ok…us too) and we purposely chose a flat hike to see what 10 miles felt like. We all made it and were pleasantly pooped by the end.

Some more than others...Devyn plopped herself down as we looked at the map when we got back and was all ready to settle in for a nap right there.

…some more than others…Devyn plopped herself down as we looked at the trail info sign when we got back and was all ready to settle in for a nap right there.

Then…it was the dreaded 12 miles of potholes…again. Fortunately, Devyn was too tired to care by this point.

No...really?

No…really?

**Note: This road will be fixed! Starting this year, construction will begin to make this road passible without going at a turtle’s pace. It will take two whole years to finish, making access to these trails more difficult, but at least they will improve this ridiculous road. That said, if you want to experience this amusement park-esque road, do it soon!

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2 responses to “Hiking the Taylor River Trail

  1. I’d love to talk with you about how much hiking Devyn can handle. I live in Colorado and really want to get a corgi. We’ve done a lot of research and they will be a perfect fit for our house, I just want to make sure they can handle long hikes. Most weekends it won’t be more than a 3-4 miler (taking no more than 2 hours), but every once in awhile we do hike a 14ner and I’d want to bring the corgi with us. Do you think they can handle a hike that long?

    • Meghan,

      Corgis are great hiking companions! First, corgis naturally like to stay with their humans. They have a natural instinct to stay close by, which is nice if you have them hiking off leash. Second, they’re ridiculously smart, so you can easily train them to hike your way – if you don’t mind them going off trail a little bit or if you want them to stick right at your side, teaching them to come as soon as you call them, etc. Last, they’re hardy little dogs. Because they were breed to be outside in all weather conditions, their coat is conducive to hiking in all sorts of environments. They may have short legs, but they can and will keep on going for as long as you do. The most we’ve done with Devyn is 10 miles which was relatively flat but pretty well covered in snow, so it was more difficult. Devyn did great; we took about a half hour break to have lunch at the 5 mile mark which renewed her energy. Usually, a little break and a snack is all Devyn needs to gain another wind (she has about 5, at least. One little break and she’s all ready to go…again). People are amazed at how she just hops up and over logs or up steep climbs- they’re very agile dogs! I can’t speak much about higher elevations. I think the highest Devyn has ever been is only about 3-4,000 ft, but I imagine they acclimate like humans! Good luck to you; I highly recommend getting a corgi friend and doing as many types of activities as you and the little one like!

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